1940s Robert Bob Stack Personal Letter Hollywood Celebrity WWII Archive

$2,200.00

(45) hand written and occasionally typed letters and (2) telegrams sent from Bob Stack to a close friend in Pittsburgh PA. Hall appears to have worked (or run) a defunct newspaper in Pittsburgh with ties to nationally recognized critics and press, which he used to help Stack's influence with the studio and be considered for more than "juvenile" roles. This...

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(45) hand written and occasionally typed letters and (2) telegrams sent from Bob Stack to a close friend in Pittsburgh PA. Hall appears to have worked (or run) a defunct newspaper in Pittsburgh with ties to nationally recognized critics and press, which he used to help Stack's influence with the studio and be considered for more than "juvenile" roles. This is not a casual acquaintance, Stack obviously at some point actually hired Hall as an independent press agent. Many specific discussions of press plans in these letters. 

 

Over the correspondence formality drips away, they meet several times, talk on the phone, give gifts and flattery; the letters are intimate and sweet at times but also full of Hollywood news, career goals and finally Stack's training and service in the war. Stack himself makes clear how odd letter writing or friendships outside the family are for him, these letters are rare source material from 

Stack's earliest career (Deanna Durbin First Love, Mortal Storm with Jimmy Stewart, American (Nice) Girl with Durbin, Red Cross Benefit for Journey's End, Badlands of Dakota and Eagle Squadron) to how his path toward Arial Gunnery Air Firing Officer came to pass through Pensacola, Alameda and Washington DC and all the discussions of service from someone very much in the public eye. 

Letters date from 9/27/1939 to 2/8/1946. The final letter ponders his career after the war and in my opinion, lets Hall know that he's not expecting his help once he's back in Hollywood. The trail ends there save an invitation and thank you card from Mr & Mrs Stack in 1956.

Many of the early letters are signed with Robert Stack's full name, most on his personal or studio stationery. As the relationship evolves, endearments rather than names are used. Almost all have envelopes and are in very good original condition with folds. I've done my best with samples in the photos, get in touch with more questions.